iOS 6.1 Code Points to New-Generation 128GB iDevice

Developers find references to a new iPhone/iPad with double the current max storage

By on January 28th, 2013 07:58 GMT

With the fourth iOS 6.1 beta set to expire today, Apple this weekend seeded a fifth beta to developers enabling them to continue their testing before the final (Gold Master) release of the software.

After confirming that iOS 6.1 beta 5 installs without trouble on iDevices without the usually required developer credentials, testers began sifting through the code to ultimately discover that Apple may have a 128GB iDevice lined up for us.

The code has actually been present in iOS 6.1 since the third beta, 9to5mac points out, but this is the first time this detail comes to light in the media.

Based on this discovery and recent findings of 128GB references in iTunes 11, we have reasons to believe Apple is planning the introduction of a new iPhone or iPad that doubles the current maximum storage capacity.

This scenario makes even more sense with Apple doubling the maximum storage capacity on its iPhones with each new “S” generation (i.e. iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4S).

With the rumored iPhone 5S slated for this year, it’s certainly a possibility Apple will introduce its first 128GB smartphone. But why upgrade just the iPhone?

In a separate report, 9to5mac cites sources as saying that Apple is gearing up to release a single new iPad model, and it’s not the iPad 5, nor the iPad mini 2. So what is it, then?

“It is a fourth-generation iPad, not a new design,” the source reportedly said, adding that the device is “a more premium SKU that will join the current line of 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB fourth-generation iPads.”

As for other details, “It comes in both the current black and white color options; It comes in both WiFi-only and WiFi + Cellular versions; 10-pack deals (in both colors) for educational institutions will be offered.”

It certainly doesn’t sound too farfetched to consider that both the iPhone 5S and this new iPad are getting storage upgrades. All that remains to be seen is when.

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