Winter Storm Athena Hits the US East Coast Shortly After Hurricane Sandy

The nor'easter adds insult to injury, leads to new evacuations and power outages

  Nor'easter hits the US East Coast
Recent news from the US informs us that meteorologists were quite right in predicting that on Wednesday, November 7, the country's East Coast would be hit by a new storm.

Recent news from the US informs us that meteorologists were quite right in predicting that on Wednesday, November 7, the country's East Coast would be hit by a new storm.

Although not as powerful as hurricane Sandy, this nor'easter seems to add insult to injury, meaning that its over 35 mph winds, together with heavy snowfalls, ended up hitting the same areas that hurricane Sandy wrecked only a few days ago.

Thus, this winter storm called for new evacuations in various parts of New York, and also brought forth a new series of power outages, sources say.

Most of the evacuations were carried out in order to make sure that any potential floods would not lead to human victims. Moreover, roughly 1,200 flights in or out of these areas were canceled.

What local officials feared first and foremost was that the nor'easter's winds would make the debris left behind by hurricane Sandy go flying through the air and cause even more damage to the already vulnerable areas.

“With winds picking up to 30-, 40-, 50-mile-per-hour gusts," he added, "our fear is that if people are out and about they could be hit by flying debris. We would urge people to stay in their houses, stay home, and let the storm pass,” explained Police Chief Kevin O'Hara from New Jersey.

The three American states that had the most to suffer as a result of this new storm are Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey.

According to Huffington Post, the US National Service has thus far shied away from naming the storm, yet The Weather Channel decided to name this nor'easter Athena.

“It's like a sequel to a horror movie. Here we are, nine days later — freezing, no electricity, no nothing, waiting for another storm,” James Alexander from Long Island told members of the press.

More than 12,000 workers were sent in by the Long Island Power Authority in order to help restore any damaged power lines.

Comments