Winter Is Coming to Street View, Resorts in the Alps and the Northernmost European Islands

Street View added several wintery locations in Europe, but also in Canada and the US

By on November 28th, 2012 13:51 GMT

Winter is coming in the northern hemisphere and Google is trying to get us used to the idea. As such, it just rolled out a big winter-themed Street View imagery update.

The new images range from the idyllic, the famous Swiss winter resorts, to the extreme, the Svalbard islands, the northernmost place Street View has gone to date.

"As the ski season approaches and you’re busy digging out your thermal underwear and snow boots, we hope to make your holiday preparations a little more enjoyable by adding some of the world’s favourite ski runs and resorts to Google Maps," Google explained.

If you fancy a trip to the Alps, even if it's from your computer, you'll be glad to know that resorts such as Sölden, in the Ötztal valley of Tyrol, Austria, are now up on Street View. In neighboring Switzerland, places like St. Moritz or Zermatt are now included.

If the land is too tame for your taste in these places, you can now visit the Svalbard islands, some 400 miles, 650 km north of Norway.

It's one of the northernmost land masses on the planet and there are quite a few things to see there, despite the remoteness.

Finally, Google has visited the ice roads of Estonia which, as their name suggests, are makeshift roads built on top of ice sheets, lasting as long as the weather permits.

"Whether you’re looking to discover a piste you’ve never tried before, or just want to take in some of the breathtaking scenery to get in the mood for your trip, we hope you have fun exploring locations across Europe (including runs in Switzerland, Austria, Norway, Sweden, Italy and Spain), Canada (including runs at Blue Mountain, Lake Louise and Fernie) and the US (including runs in Utah and Michigan)," Google listed all of the new Street View locations.

Comments

Svalbard, one of the northernmost land masses on Earth
   Svalbard, one of the northernmost land masses on Earth