Windows Phone 8 with Access to Millions of Wi-Fi Hotspots

Courtesy of Microsoft’s newly implemented DataSense and various partnerships

By on November 6th, 2012 13:58 GMT

During the official launch of the new Windows Phone 8 operating system last week, Microsoft unveiled that it would arrive on devices with appealing new features packed inside, including one that would provide users with important savings when it comes to data usage.

Dubbed DataSense, the functionality provides users not only with the possibility to stay on top of how much data they use each month, but it also enables them to offload traffic to less expensive networks, such as Wi-Fi ones.

DataSense was also designed to compress web pages and deliver smaller amounts of information to the device, which will further cut users’ monthly bills.

Microsoft announced at the time that it had already partnered with various wireless carriers around the world for the inclusion of this feature in Windows Phone 8, and that Verizon Wireless will be the first of them to deploy it in real-life conditions.

However, it seems that there’s actually more to it, and that the Redmond-based software giant also partnered with a company called Devicescape for offloading the cellular data from Windows Phone 8 devices to Wi-Fi networks.

A recent article on Telecoms.com explains that Devicescape will provide Windows Phone 8 users with access to its Curated Virtual Network (CVN), which includes over 11 million Wi-Fi hotspots all around the world (though most of them are located in the United States).

With automatic detection of better connectivity options included into the mix, the feature should bring some changes to how people perceive Windows Phone.

Coupled with DataSense, the access to this large amount of hotspots should deliver a far better experience to users, especially to those who want to have their live tiles working at all times on their Windows Phone 8’s screen.

However, there might still be some drawback, such as the need to manually select the connection type and the like, but things might actually get better in the not too distant future.

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