Watch Our Planet Evolve Through the Decades in Google's Massive Space Photo Project

Google has put together two million photos of every corner of the Earth

By on May 9th, 2013 13:08 GMT

Google has worked with the US Geological Survey, NASA, and Time to put together the most comprehensive and easily navigable online archive of historical images of our planet – every corner of our planet –, going back several decades.

The images come from NASA's Landsat satellites which have been surveying our planet for several decades. Google's online archive only goes back to 1984.

Still, Google used some 2,068,467,909 terabytes of data, picking the best images in any given year for all locations.

It then put together gigantic images, one for each year, of the entire surface of our planet, 1.78 terapixels each.

All of them are now available online, through a tool put together with Time’s part of the Timelapse project.

You can search for any location on Earth, or scan through the map, and go back and forth in time. The most interesting locations are going to be those heavily altered by human intervention, though that's almost never a good thing.

Glaciers melting, the Amazon deforestation, rapid urbanization in crowded cities, and so on. It's all there if you know where to look for it. Thankfully, Time has picked several locations to highlight.

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Time's Timelapse project, powered by Google
   Time's Timelapse project, powered by Google