Victoria's Secret Agrees to Detox Fashion

Limited Brands agrees to eliminate hazardous chemicals from its supply chain

By on January 22nd, 2013 21:21 GMT

Quite a while back, the environmentalists working with Greenpeace launched an international campaign whose purpose was that of greening up the fashion industry.

Recent news on this topic informs us that Limited Brands, the owner of Victoria's Secret and other similar labels, has agreed to give into Greenpeace's demands and green up its working agenda by making sure its supply chain is completely free of any hazardous chemicals.

According to Greenpeace, it was only last year when one of their investigations revealed that one item of Victoria's Secret underwear contained worrying amounts of a chemical compound known to cause hormonal imbalances.

Therefore, it need not come as a surprise that members of the general public agreed to lend Greenpeace a helping hand in convincing Limited Brands to pay more attention to how its supply chain and the products it marketed impacted on the environment.

As these environmentalists put it, “Today’s commitment is Limited Brands’ first important step to tackle this issue, and includes an explicit process to ensure the total elimination of both phthalates and perfluorinated chemicals (another hormone-disrupting chemical group of high concern) long before the 2020 deadline.”

Following its commitment to detox fashion, Limited Brands is to release information concerning the overall levels of pollution caused by its supply chain.

Once this data is made available to the general public, the company is to take steps towards phasing out its use of harmful chemical compounds.

Commenting on this company's decision, Greenpeace made a case of how, “Thanks to the passionate support of concerned consumers, activists and fashionistas it seems as though 2013 will finally be the year when the textile industry begins to end its addiction to toxic chemicals.”

“For brands that have so far tried to bury their head in the sands and ignore the issue – such as Calvin Klein, GAP and G Star Raw – they will need to up their game, or risk losing out to more savvy competitors,” the organization went on to add.

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Limited brands agrees to improve on its ecological footprint
   Limited brands agrees to improve on its ecological footprint