The New Rotating 24-inch HP LCD

For gamers, graphics designers and the rest

By on September 4th, 2007 15:18 GMT
Large screed LCD computer monitors are becoming very popular as their price tag goes down and their features list grows. Once they were targeted at the few graphics designer professionals that could afford them, now they are very popular among gamers and computer enthusiasts: the 24-inch widescreen format LCD computer monitors. In an attempt to make the most from the increasing demand of widescreen LCD computer monitors, HP is going to push forward yet another 24-inch monitor.

Named w2408, the new HP monitor is packed with features and technologies like BrightView and other anti-glare or anti-reflective methods of increasing the viewing angle to 160 degrees both on the vertical and the horizontal planes. Coming with complete HDCP support the new HP 24-inch widescreen LCD is able to play HD DVD or Blu-ray digital content, when paired with an HDCP compliant graphics card. HP is traditionally known and well-liked for its LCD monitors that respect a high part of the natural color gamut and HP's newest addition to its product lines makes no exception as it is able to display up to 92 percent of the color palette, being a valuable tool for graphics designers and CAD workers.

Apart from the traditional features that users expect from a high end LCD monitor, HP also integrated four high speed USB ports into its newest monitor, rear facing speakers with a 2W output and a headphone jack as well as a keyboard parking area. What makes the HP w2408 LCD computer monitor different for almost all competing products, is its rotational capabilities which include the automatic software rotation of all images when the monitor is turned. In order to be easily transportable the HP w2408 LCD computer monitor features a detachable base and a standard VESA100 4-hole mounting pattern.

Because of its high dimensions, the HP LCD monitor comes with a different aspect ratio than most other widescreen displays, the 16:10 aspect as well as a 1920x1200 native resolution at 60Hz. The display has a standard 5ms response time as well as a high level of brightness of no less than 400 nits while the contrast ratio is 1000:1. A potential bad point for a high-end monitor like the newest product from HP is that it features the traditional CCFL backlighting and it does not adopt the better and newer OLED technology.

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