Edward Cullen's Feeding Grounds Now Under Protection

The Nature Conservancy acquires land in Washington's Olympic Peninsula

  The natural habitat of Twilight's vampires and werewolves is now under protection
It may very well be that the “Twilight” saga has come to an end, but it seems that Stephanie Meyer's vampires and werewolves will not be forced to move out of the forests of Washington's Olympic Peninsula.

It may very well be that the “Twilight” saga has come to an end, but it seems that Stephanie Meyer's vampires and werewolves will not be forced to move out of the forests of Washington's Olympic Peninsula.

This is because The Nature Conservancy has acquired significant portions of land in this part of the US, and intends to make sure both said fictional characters and the local wildlife get to keep their natural habitats.

These goals are to be achieved by means of a constant collaboration with local coastal tribes such as the Quinault and the Quileute, whose members agreed to take part in projects concerning forest restoration and water sources cleanup.

These local tribes are first and foremost concerned about restoring the salmon population in this part of the US.

PRNewswire
says that, over these past 18 months, The Nature Conservancy has grabbed hold of 3,000 acres of forest along the Clearwater River, fairly close to Forks.

As well as this, this green oriented organization has acquired an additional 8,000 acres of land further south, and intends to use it to restore the local giant tree population.

This means that animal species such as bears, spotted owls, marbled murrelets and the Roosevelt elk will avoid becoming endangered and eventually extinct as a result of habitat loss.

Not to mention the fact that this will in turn translate into the Cullens not being left without their food source.

Commenting on these recent achievements in terms of environmental protection and wildlife conservation, Dave Roth from The Nature Conservancy made a case of how, “This builds on more than ten years of work along the rivers and forests of the Washington coast.”

“With partners like the Quinault and the Quileute and other local communities, we've begun the 100-year-process of restoring old-growth conditions,” he went on to add.

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