Student Figures Out a Way to Harvest Electricity from Thin Air

Dennis Siegel's electromagnetic harvester soaks electricity from its surroundings

By on February 13th, 2013 21:21 GMT

A German student named Dennis Siegel is now getting significant media attention, all thanks to his succeeding in piecing together an innovative device which allegedly harvests electricity from thin air.

More precisely, the so-called electromagnetic harvester this student has designed and manufactured is fully capable of recharging a run-off-the-mill AA battery by soaking whatever radiation happens to find itself in its proximity.

To cut a long story short, each and every electrical device generates a certain amount of electromagnetic radiation, and once this radiation is made to pass across a coil of wire, electricity is produced.

Thus, the electromagnetic harvester can generate the electricity it needs in order to get the AA battery under its care back on its feet by processing the radiation emitted either by overhead power lines, or from coffee machines and refrigerators.

Interestingly enough, it can supposedly also make use of whatever electromagnetic radiation emissions WiFi routers and smartphones produce when in use.

Apparently, Dennis Siegel's electromagnetic harvester comes in two distinct versions: the first tackles very low frequencies, such as the 50/60Hz signals from mains power, whereas the second deals with megahertz (radio, GSM) and gigahertz (Bluetooth/WiFi) radiation.

Although it all depends on the strength of the electromagnetic field it finds itself in, it looks like this electromagnetic harvester can recharge precisely one AA battery per day.

ExtremeTech
explains that, although the idea of soaking electricity from thin air might sound a bit unrealistic to the inexperienced, the fact remains that Dennis Siegel's project is based on some very solid scientific principles.

The same sources argue that what it all comes down to is wireless power transfer, an idea that is already shaping out a new future for the gadgets industry.

Dennis Siegel is currently studying at the University of Arts Bremen, and by the looks of it, he intends to patent this innovative idea of his as soon as possible.

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