Software Pirates Release Tool to Crack Windows 8 Apps

Get full Windows Store apps without actually paying for them

  The tool turns trial versions into full apps
It was only a matter of time, but the inevitable has finally happened: software pirates have just released a downloadable application that allows users to download and run full Windows Store apps. For free, that is.

It was only a matter of time, but the inevitable has finally happened: software pirates have just released a downloadable application that allows users to download and run full Windows Store apps. For free, that is.

The cracking tool basically enables Windows 8 users to install and run unsigned apps, thus bypassing all protection systems bundled into the Windows Store.

Most of the apps available in the Store are freeware at this point, but the paid ones usually come with a trial version supposed to let potential buyers get a taste of the app before actually paying for it.

According to BetaNews, the hacking tool uses this trial version to get the full build of the app at no cost. There are some limitations and risks, though.

First of all, the app needs to patch some Windows 8 system files, so in case the overall stability or the performance of your computer is affected, no one will help you deal with it.

What’s more, the cracked apps deployed on a Windows 8 machine cannot be updated via the Windows Store, but instead the user must redownload and reinstall the cracked app whenever an update is available.

It appears that this hacking tool works with absolutely any paid app available in the Store that comes with a trial version, so it’s pretty hard to believe that such a cracking solution will last much longer.

We won’t release the name of the app or provide a download link as Softpedia does not encourage piracy, and we’re pretty sure that Microsoft is already looking into ways to patch this Windows Store protection flaw and prevent similar cases in the future.

Of course, the Redmond-based technology company is yet to comment on this, but we’ve already contacted Microsoft, so we’ll get back to you as soon as we get an answer.

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