Skype Suspends All Hijacked Accounts, Manually Restores Them

Accounts hacked via the recently spotted security hole are automatically suspended

  The password reset option was temporarily disabled until Skype patched the flaw
Skype has already fixed the critical security hole that allowed hackers to break into accounts using only the victims’ email addresses, but it seems like some accounts actually got hacked in the meantime.

Skype has already fixed the critical security hole that allowed hackers to break into accounts using only the victims’ email addresses, but it seems like some accounts actually got hacked in the meantime.

That’s why the programmers over at Skype have decided to automatically suspend all hijacked accounts and to manually restore them once the user proves that he’s the actual owner of a specific account.

Emil Protalinski of TNW writes that Microsoft sends some automated emails to those who got their accounts hacked, informing that unauthorized activity has been detected.

“Due to unusual behavior, we’ve suspended your account as a precaution. We take security seriously at Skype and we’ve taken this measure as we suspect that your details might have fallen into the wrong hands,” the email reads.

Users are required to confirm their identity in order to release their accounts, with required information including Skype name, email address, Skype account creation year and details on three of the contacts.

Once the request is submitted, Skype staff checks the provided details and manually restores the account. Still, you’re asked to reset your password, just to make sure hackers won’t use the same password to get back into your account.

Skype has already confirmed that a “small number” of users may have been hacked, but it hasn’t provided any specific details on the matter.

“We are reaching out to a small number of users who may have been impacted to assist as necessary. Skype is committed to providing a safe and secure communications experience to our users and we apologize for the inconvenience,” the company said in a statement.

“This issue affected some users where multiple Skype accounts were registered to the same email address.”

The security flaw has already been patched, but you can read more about the problem right here.

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