Six People Arrested for Selling Fake Windows Product Keys

Microsoft continues the fight against piracy across the world

  The six criminals were selling fake Windows product keys over the Internet
Microsoft goes on with its anti-piracy efforts across the world, trying to shut down networks selling illegal copies of its software, including Windows and Office.

Microsoft goes on with its anti-piracy efforts across the world, trying to shut down networks selling illegal copies of its software, including Windows and Office.

This time, the tech giant has managed to get six people arrested in Humberside, all accused of selling fake Windows product keys across the Internet.

PC Pro is reporting that the six suspects were selling Windows installation discs and key cards on an online shopping service, but there are no statics available as to how many people actually purchased such items.

And still, police estimated that the sold counterfeited products are worth £100,000 (€120,000 / $162,000).

The ages of those involved in the scam are probably the most surprising element of the investigation. Police officers arrested four men aged 20, 38, and 70, as well as two 66-year-old and 40-year-old women.

“Cybercrime can take many forms – ranging from manufacturing and selling counterfeit software, to stealing money, personal information and even identities from people’s computers using malware," Abrahim Bakhtiar, an attorney at Microsoft's Digital Crimes Unit (DCU), was quoted as saying by the same source.

“Microsoft works closely with many law enforcement agencies such as PIPCU and Trading Standards to ensure criminal actions are pursued. This investigation is a real testament to PIPCU’s and Microsoft DCU's resolve when it comes to stamping out cybercrime and we applaud the swift action PIPCU and Humberside Police have undertaken in relation to this case.”

According to police officers who took part to the investigation, Microsoft tipped off the investigators, so the company most likely collected IPs and other data from the aforementioned online shopping service.

Microsoft hasn’t issued a statement on this, but the company is probably delighted with the fact that it managed to bust another piracy network selling Windows keys across the Internet.

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