SandForce 2000-Series SSDs Face Problems, May Be Withdrawn from Market

  SandForce SF-2000 series SSD controller
After numerous report regarding failing SandForce 2000-series powered SSDs reached the Web, it seems like the company is now considering withdrawing all the solid state drives that use these controllers from the market.

After numerous report regarding failing SandForce 2000-series powered SSDs reached the Web, it seems like the company is now considering withdrawing all the solid state drives that use these controllers from the market.

This news was uncovered by the SweClockers publications which claims sources near the manufacturers involved have told them that the sale of such drives will soon be stopped.

The first drive to be affected by this process seems to be the 120GB version of the Corsair Force 3, which the same publication reports that has now stopped selling in Sweden (this is the only Corsair unit delivered in large volumes in Sweden).

If these rumors turn out to be indeed true, other manufacturers should stop selling such drives soon.

This could presumably affect companies such as OCZ, OWC, and other smaller brands who sell this kind of drives.

According to Sweclockers, a wide number SandForce 2000-based SSD owners have complained that their drives have suddenly stopped working. Symptoms seem to vary from Windows blue screens to the BIOS' inability to detect the drive when booting.

Right now, it isn't known if all the SandForce 2000-series controllers are affected by these issues.

The consumer version of the SandForce 2000 controller was introduced in late February 2011 and has been used in various high-performance solid state drives from Corsair, OCZ and OWC.

Other SSD makers have also announced solutions based on this series of controllers, including Kingston which recently unveiled its first SandForce drive, the HyperX SSD.

At the time this article was written, Newegg still retailed a wide series of SF-2000 drives from OCZ. In addition, the Mercury Pro Extreme 6GB was still listed on Other World Computing's website.

We'll keep you up to date with how things evolve from this point on.

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