San Francisco City Attorney Sues Monster Energy Drink

Dennis Herrera is not pleased with how the beverage is marketed to kids

  Energy drinks are said to cause significant health problems to minors
Several studies have shown that energy drinks can be linked to various health problems, especially when consumed by those of certain ages and those suffering with various medical conditions.

Several studies have shown that energy drinks can be linked to various health problems, especially when consumed by those of certain ages and those suffering with various medical conditions.

Still, the news that San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera has decided to sue Monster Beverage Corporation is bound to be a head-turner.

By the looks of it, what bothers Dennis Herrera is the fact that, despite its containing elevated levels of caffeine, said drink is still being marketed not just to teenagers, but also to kids.

According to The Examiner, the San Francisco City Attorney hopes that his lawsuit will eventually lead to Monster Beverage's being made to both cut down on the amounts of caffeine it puts in this beverage and quit marketing to minors altogether.

The same source informs us that, as pointed out by a spokesperson for Monster Beverage, the company has not at any time argued that its drink is intended to be consumed by minors.

However, Dennis Herrera maintains that simply using kids to promote the beverage on the company's official website and sponsoring youth sporting competitions goes against rules and regulations meant to promote public health.

The Inquisitr quotes Dennis Herrera, who supposedly made a case of how, “Monster Energy is unique among energy drink makers for the extent to which it targets children and youth in its marketing, despite the known risks its products pose to young people’s health and safety.”

“As the industry’s worst-offender, Monster Energy should reform its irresponsible and illegal marketing practices before they’re forced to by regulators or courts,” the San Francisco City Attorney further argued.

As reported, it was towards the end of 2012 when this particular energy drink was argued to have caused the death of a 14-year-old girl named Anais Fournier.

At that time, the girl's parents decided to sue the company and argued that their daughter's heart attack was the result of her having drunk just two cans of Monster energy drink.

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