Rex Mundi Hackers Blackmail Drake International, Threaten to Leak 300,000 Records

The company says it has contacted the police and it will not give in to extortion

By on January 10th, 2013 13:52 GMT

The extortionist hackers from the Rex Mundi collective are back. In the past, they attempted to blackmail Dexia Bank, AmeriCash and Webassur, but now they’ve turned their attention to Drake International, a Canadian job placement firm.

According to the hackers, the company’s systems were hacked last week. They claim to have gained access to 300,000 “confidential job applicant records” and information on the company’s clients.

“We immediately contacted Drake International to offer them not to release the data in exchange of a mere $50,000 (fifty thousand US Dollars). So far, we have unfortunately not heard back from the nice folks over at Drake,” the hackers said.

“Does this mean that they do not care about their clients and job applicants' privacy? You be the judge.”

They warn that if the company fails to make the payment by the end of this week, they will publish the entire database – which includes the details of candidates from Australia, UK, Canada and New Zealand – on Pastebin.

To demonstrate that they’ve gained access to all that data, they’ve published a small sample of job applicant and client details. The sample data includes names, email addresses, passwords, references, phone numbers and other information.

On the other hand, Drake International representatives have told Financial Post that they have no intention of paying the hackers, even though they admit that the hackers have managed to obtain names, email addresses, passwords and phone numbers.

They’re currently working on notifying all the affected individuals, advising them to change their passwords.

The company has also notified the police and they say they’re working with authorities on ensuring that their candidates and clients are protected.

Tony Scala, vice-president of marketing and client service at Drake International, has also revealed that the database breached by Rex Mundi is “very old.”

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