Picture of the Day: Underwater Ice Bubbles

The bubbles are created by gas-releasing plants, researchers explain

By on January 29th, 2013 18:51 GMT

Those visiting the man-made Abraham Lake during winter time might be lucky enough to have a look at these stunning underwater ice bubbles up close.

Said lake is situated at the base of the Rocky Mountains in Canada, and researchers explain that its putting on such a show during the harsh winter months is a direct result of being populated by gas-releasing plants.

More precisely, these plants produce methane and dispose of it in their surrounding environment. As the methane rises to the surface, it freezes and forms these stunning patterns, Daily Mail explains.

The picture was taken by 40-year-old American photographer Chris Phillips, who very much enjoys taking his camera out for a walk on this frozen lake.

“I usually use crampons to avoid slipping but on one of my first trips to the lake, a giant gust of wind came barreling across the lake, picked me up and threw me back on the ice,” Chris Phillips said about his habit of taking pictures of these so-called underwater ice bubbles.

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