Number of People with Alzheimer’s Set to Triple by 2050

The phenomenon will put tremendous strain on society, researchers warn

  Study warns the US might soon have to face a so-called Alzheimer's disease epidemic
Yesterday's issue of the scientific journal Neurology witnessed the publication of a new report stating that, in less than 40 years' time, it is quite likely that the number of people in the US suffering with Alzheimer’s will triple.

Yesterday's issue of the scientific journal Neurology witnessed the publication of a new report stating that, in less than 40 years' time, it is quite likely that the number of people in the US suffering with Alzheimer’s will triple.

These predictions were brought forth by researchers working with the American Academy of Neurology.

From their standpoint, this boom in the number of reported Alzheimer’s disease cases will translate into a tremendous amount of strain being placed both on the country's financial resources and on the American society as a whole.

Because of this, the specialists behind this report demand that the country's officials agree to invest more money in Alzheimer’s disease-related research, treatments and preventive strategies.

According to the official website for the American Academy of Neurology, Jennifer Weuve, one of this study's co-authors, commented on the findings of this investigation as follows:

“This increase is due to an aging baby boom generation. It will place a huge burden on society, disabling more people who develop the disease, challenging their caregivers, and straining medical and social safety nets.”

Furthermore, “Our study draws attention to an urgent need for more research, treatments and preventive strategies to reduce this epidemic.”

The same source informs us that, in order to reach these conclusions concerning a potential so-called Alzheimer’s disease epidemic in the US, the researchers have analyzed roughly 18 years' worth of data collected while looking into the mental and physical health of 10,802 African-American and Caucasian people, ages 65 and older, all of whom were living in Chicago.

This data was later on compared to information provided by the US Census Bureau.

“Our detailed projections use the most up-to-date data, but they are similar to projections made years and decades ago. All of these projections anticipate a future with a dramatic increase in the number of people with Alzheimer’s and should compel us to prepare for it,” stated Jennifer Weuve.

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