Nokia Working on Patenting Its Morph Concept Phone

The company filed a patent application for a device with transformable body

  Nokia patents a handset with transformable body
One of the most interesting devices that Nokia might come up with sometime in the not too distant future is a mobile phone with a morphing design.

One of the most interesting devices that Nokia might come up with sometime in the not too distant future is a mobile phone with a morphing design.

Featuring a flexible body, including the screen and some of its internals, the device would enable users to wear it as a bracelet, or hold it in their hands as a leaf-shaped candybar.

Clearly, this appears to be an idea extracted from a sci-fi movie, but Nokia fans should already be familiar with the Nokia Morph concept phone, which allegedly features the capabilities mentioned above.

Apparently, the day when this device would become reality is closer than believed: Nokia is working on patenting the flexible device.

In fact, the company has already filed an application to have the patent approved. This means that they might be indeed considering the possibility of marketing a handset that would feature a transformable body.

But there’s more to it, as Nokia also mentioned in the patent filing that the device could sport connectivity to “a remote processing unit,” along with other features.

The said patent application offers more info on the matter:

An apparatus comprises a transformable body configured to be elastically stretchable between at least a first configuration and a second configuration, a user input device, a user input device configured to receive user input signal, a communication interface configured to provide a wireless link for the apparatus and a flexible interconnection between at least two components within the transformable body.

The apparatus may perform determining of user information based on the user input signal, transmitting at least part of the user information over the wireless link to a remote processing unit, receiving feedback information from the remote processing unit and presenting the feedback information to the user.


Of course, the fact that Nokia applied for this patent does not prove the upcoming availability of such a device, though it strongly suggests that this would be possible. Enthusiasts will certainly keep their fingers crossed for it to be launched.

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