Nikon 24.1 MP DSLR Camera Is Weather Sealed

It has a professional processing engine and will be available in March 2013

  Nikon D7100 camera
With Sony covering the low-end and mid-range photo and video camera market segment, Nikon is getting ready to launch a higher quality camera called D7100, equipped with a powerful CMOS sensor.

With Sony covering the low-end and mid-range photo and video camera market segment, Nikon is getting ready to launch a higher quality camera called D7100, equipped with a powerful CMOS sensor.

By low-end and mid-range Sony cameras we mean the NEX-3N and A58 that we wrote about just yesterday (February 20, 2013).

The Nikon model that will easily outclass both of those products is called D7100 and is a successor to the D7000.

The 24.1-megapixel CMOS image sensor is the heart of the device, since it sets the level that all the other hardware components need to keep up with.

Said sensor has an ISO range (light sensitivity) of 100 to 6400, but can also be pushed all the way to 25,600 when the Nikon Hi2 extension module is involved.

The autofocus system is another asset, with 51 perspective points, (15 cross-type sensors in the middle).

Moving on, Nikon gave its product a 3.2-inch RGBW LCD display with a 1229k-dot resolution. This is where the preview of the photo or video is shown.

More important is the image processing engine though: Expeed 3, the same one used in full-frame Nikon professional equipment.

Overall, the new camera will have a higher image capture and video recording speed, a higher image quality and better energy efficiency than other devices of similar purpose.

Other specifications include a pair of SD card slots (indeed, there are two, not just one), a 1900mAh EN-EL15 battery, video recording in 1080 / 30p or 1080 / 60i (29 minutes and 59 seconds max recording time) and magnesium alloy shells for the top and back covers.

The hard construction was decided upon because the Nikon wanted this high-end camera to be weather proof, and it wouldn't be much point to it if people couldn't risk using it during hikes on misty mountains.

Finally, there is no optical low-pass (or antialiasing) filter, since the pixel density is high enough to make it unnecessary. Photos will be sharper because of this, though the risk of moire might be higher.

Sales will start in March, for £1,099.99 / $1,199.95 / 1,199.95 Euro (probably), or £1,299.99 / $1,599.95 / 1,599.95 Euro.

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