Most and Least Emotional Nations Disclosed

Singapore stands as the most emotionless country in the world

  Scientists reveal Philippine as the country with the highest emotional rate
A research conducted by Gallup reveals that Singaporeans stand as the less emotional nation in the world, while Filipinos are their absolute opposite.

A research conducted by Gallup reveals that Singaporeans stand as the less emotional nation in the world, while Filipinos are their absolute opposite.

Over 150 countries have been involved in Gallup's direct or telephone interviews. The survey started in 2009 and ended in 2011, with about 1,000 people over the age of 15 have been interviewed, Live Science reports.

People were offered five positive emotions (enjoyment, smiling and laughing a lot, feeling well-rested, being treated with respect and learning or doing something interesting) and five negative ones (sadness, anger, physical pain, stress and worry) and were asked to say whether or not they had felt these emotions throughout the previous day.

Making an average between the countries' inhabitants and the number of people who gave an affirmative response to the given emotions affecting them, researchers concluded that Singaporeans were the most emotionless people studied.

Only 36% of Singaporeans manifest these emotions on a daily basis.

Singapore was followed by Georgia, Lithuania, Russia, Madagascar and Ukraine in the top of the less emotional countries.

At the opposite side of the list stood the Philippines, with 60 percent of inhabitants declaring to be experiencing these emotions daily. After the Philippines come Salvador, Bahrain, Oman, Colombia, Chile and Costa Rica. (See full list of most and least emotional countries here).

Researchers have also made a hierarchy considering the negative and positive emotions separately.

It turned out that North Africa and countries in the Middle East register the highest level of negative emotions, with Iraq, Palestinian Territories and Bahrain standing on top of the list.

Meanwhile, Latin America comes first in terms of positive feelings, with Panama, Paraguay and Venezuela on top.

Although the relation between a country's economic status and its population's level of negative feelings experienced appears clear in the hierarchy above, researchers say that even with a substantial melioration in this field the problem might not get solved.

Singapore can be given as example: with one of the lowest unemployment levels in the world and one of the highest gross domestic products, it is still a people with very few positive feelings.

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