Microsoft Attacks Google Once Again, This Time over YouTube App

The war between the two technology giants continues

  Google chooses not to comment on Microsoft's accusations
The Microsoft versus Google fight continues with a new attack launched by the Redmond-based technology firm that reveals yet another unfair tactic used by the search company.

The Microsoft versus Google fight continues with a new attack launched by the Redmond-based technology firm that reveals yet another unfair tactic used by the search company.

As we’ve told you a few hours ago, Microsoft claims that Google is blocking them from releasing a full-featured YouTube app for Windows Phone.

“In 2010 and again more recently, Google blocked Microsoft’s new Windows Phones from operating properly with YouTube. Google has enabled its own Android phones to access YouTube so that users can search for video categories, find favorites, see ratings, and so forth in the rich user interfaces offered by those phones.

“It’s done the same thing for the iPhones offered by Apple, which doesn’t offer a competing search service,” Dave Heiner, vice president & deputy general counsel, Microsoft, said.

But this isn’t the first time when Microsoft tries to show everyone that Google is playing dirty.

The so-called Scroogled campaign released a couple of months ago was supposed to emphasize that Google is actually serving users ads instead of relevant results on its Shopping service, with Microsoft encouraging everyone to use Bing.

What’s more, the Redmond-based technology company used the Bing It On campaign to demonstrate that Bing provides better search results than Google.

And last but not least, Outlook.com has been upgraded to become a more powerful rival for Google’s very own Gmail, as several studies have revealed that users actually prefer Microsoft’s email service.

Google, on the other hand, has chosen a pretty different strategy, so it refuses to comment on Microsoft’s accusations.

The Mountain View-based company, however, recently announced that it wouldn’t release any other apps for Windows 8 platforms, so consumers who wish to access Gmail or other services from the Modern UI have no other choice than to stick to third-party clients.

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