Man Unwillingly Races at 125 Mph After Finding He Has No Brakes

The French driver's journey ended when the car crashed in Belgium

  Man has the journey of his life after finding his car has no brakes
A 36-year-old French driver named Frank Lecerf recently got to experience the car journey of a lifetime, meaning that he unwillingly got to race at the top speed of 125 mph (roughly 200 kph) over a rather considerable distance.

A 36-year-old French driver named Frank Lecerf recently got to experience the car journey of a lifetime, meaning that he unwillingly got to race at the top speed of 125 mph (roughly 200 kph) over a rather considerable distance.

Information made available to the public thus far says that the man simply went to pick up some groceries from a local supermarket.

Upon his trying to return home, he discovered that his Renault Laguna 3 was anything but willing to slow down.

Thus, the car no longer had any brakes, and Frank Lecerf was left with no choice except continue to drive it at said speed until the vehicle ran out of fuel and crashed in a ditch.

Furthermore, it seems that the man only wished to travel at about 60 mph (about 96 kph), yet every time he tried to hit the brakes the Renault Laguna 3 he was driving would only accelerate.

Sources
report that, while this driver's point of departure was in France, in Pont-de-Metz in the Somme, the ditch he crashed in was located fairly close to the Belgian town of La Panne.

Wishing to lend him a helping hand, police officials demanded that all the barriers this man was set to encounter at oll stations be lifted, and that other drivers make sure to keep out of his way.

As well as this, a Renault engineer stayed on the phone with him, and tried to offer him some guidance.

Following this experience, Frank Lecerf, who also happens to be an epileptic, is planning to file a lawsuit against the company that manufactured the faulty vehicle.

Because this French driver is suffering with said medical condition and therefore his Renault Laguna 3 has been specially designed so as to allow him to use controls on the steering wheel in order to operate the throttle and the brake, Renault engineers maintain that, all things considered, this hectic journey might have been nothing more and nothing less but the result of human error.

Still, prior to pinning the blame on either the man, or some electronic faults, the vehicle is to be subjected to a thorough investigation.

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