Lucky Magazine Apologizes for Bad Photoshop Job on Britney Spears

Magazine owns up to the mistake on Twitter, still underplays it

  Britney Spears looks unreal, plastic, fake-haired on the cover of the latest issue of Lucky
The latest issue of Lucky magazine brings a photospread and interview with none other than Britney Spears, singer, businesswoman and, as of late, X Factor judge. Since there’s something seriously wrong with the cover, Lucky is apologizing for it.

The latest issue of Lucky magazine brings a photospread and interview with none other than Britney Spears, singer, businesswoman and, as of late, X Factor judge. Since there’s something seriously wrong with the cover, Lucky is apologizing for it.

The cover and the accompanying photos featured such bad Photoshop on Britney’s face that she seemed to be wearing a wig in all the pics, while also having a quite expressionless face.

That Britney’s hair isn’t entirely real is a known fact, especially to fans (she’s very partial to extensions), but the mane she’s sporting in the Lucky photos can’t possibly be real – at least, not judging by how low the hairline is.

That, and the fact that her skin looks like porcelain (unbelievably white and even more unbelievably flawless) and her entire face has somewhat of a frozen quality, got fans really upset.

They took to Twitter to express their disbelief that Lucky would retouch a natural beauty like Britney to such an extent, to the point where she hardly resembles herself anymore.

In response, Lucky has issued an apology on the same social networking website.

“Thank you all for sharing your thoughts on our cover! As always, we will share with our team and we're sorry to have let some of you down,” the mag says.

While that’s not exactly an admission of guilt, it’s more than what other magazines say in the aftermath of such Photoshopping scandals.

In a recent interview, Victoria’s Secret Angel Erin Heatherton defended the practice of retouching photos before they release, even to such a great extent.

She said the idea of such pics was to sell a fantasy not represent reality and, as such, the practice was ok.

Moreover, as we also informed you at the time, she also stated her belief that, ultimately, it was parents who were entirely responsible for making their kids understand the difference between said fantasy and the real world.

Comments