LG Wants Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 Gone, Viewing Angle Patent Breached

This patent war may just become as large as the one with Apple

  Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1, LG's newest target
Samsung and LG have always been a bit wary of each other, like all rivals, but their differences haven't been solved. In fact, the two have gone from competing to fighting over rights to sell products.

Samsung and LG have always been a bit wary of each other, like all rivals, but their differences haven't been solved. In fact, the two have gone from competing to fighting over rights to sell products.

The situation is eerily reminiscent of the way the fight originally started between Samsung and Apple, which doesn't bode well at all.

Up until back in late 2011, the two were actually cordial towards one another, but then Samsung released the Galaxy Tab and Apple sued it for it.

Long story short, the two are now trying to get the other's phones and tablets banned, with varying degrees of success.

LG's latest actions may very well lead to a similar situation between it and Samsung.

The two began to clash a couple of months ago, when Samsung accused LG of stealing its OLED technology.

LG counter-sued and, thus, started this so-called dance, one that seemed to be getting worse and worse the closer Christmas got.

Sadly, a new set of accusations managed to squeeze through even in the space between that particular holiday and New Year's Eve.

LG is essentially accusing Samsung of patent infringement, only it isn't about OLED this time. Instead, the company claims that Samsung breached three of its patents regarding the improvement of viewing angles when creating the Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet.

LG wants a full billion dollars for each day the Note 10.1 continues to be made and sold (757 million Euro).

"Through this action, LG Display seeks to completely stop the sale, manufacture, and importation of [the] infringing Samsung product," the South Korean display maker said in a statement.

Samsung, for its part, is acting quite blasé about the whole thing, considering the attack unjustified and unlikely to lead to any sort of favorable outcome for its newest enemy.

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