Internet Explorer Is the Top Browser Worldwide but It Causes Microsoft Trouble

The company is very likely to be fined by EU’s antitrust body

  IE10 is now available on both Windows 8 and Windows 7
Internet Explorer remains the number one browser in the entire world, according to some new statistics, but it’s also the main reason for a significant fine that could be received by the Redmond-based technology giant next month.

Internet Explorer remains the number one browser in the entire world, according to some new statistics, but it’s also the main reason for a significant fine that could be received by the Redmond-based technology giant next month.

Net Applications data claims that Internet Explorer retained the top browser crown in February, as it was installed on no less than 55.82 percent of computers worldwide. The fiercest rivals remain Mozilla Firefox, that arrived second with 20.12 percent, and Google Chrome, that was third with 16.27 percent.

As for versions, Internet Explorer 8 is the number one build with 23.38 percent of users, followed by Internet Explorer 9 with 21.67 percent.

IE6 is the fifth in this top with a share of 6.33 percent, which is a bit surprising given the fact that it’s an 11-year-old browser.

Internet Explorer, on the other hand, may bring Microsoft another huge fine from the European Commission, as antitrust regulators are reportedly ready to make a decision on the company’s failure to provide users with a browser choice screen.

EU regulators have requested Microsoft to offer a browser ballot screen on the Old Continent to provide some alternatives for Internet Explorer, including rivals Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome.

Microsoft has failed to do so and continued to offer Internet Explorer as the one and only browser on millions of computers sold on the continent, so the European Commission is now investigating the company for infringing competition rules.

A new report by Reuters indicates that a verdict is very likely to be announced in late March, as regulators are ready to issue a new fine for the Redmond-based software giant.

Microsoft doesn’t want to comment on this subject, but the company said a few months ago that it would accept any decision from the European Commission without further appeals.

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