Intel 2013 Haswell CPUs Get Detailed in Series of Leaked Slides

Intel plans a special Ultrabook version with a SoC design

  Intel Shark Bay platfrom roadmap
Now that Ivy Bridge has entered volume manufacturing, Intel has turned its attention towards its next-generation architecture code named Haswell, which was just detailed in a couple of leaked slides together with the Lynx Point chipset.Haswell will be a “Tock” on the chip maker's roadmap meaning that it uses an entirely new architecture built using the 22nm production node.The first chips using this new core are expected to land in 2013 and according to the slides published by Chiphell, Intel plans to split its product range into two distinct groups.The first group includes the company's desktop and notebook processors, while the latter is specially designed for Ultrabooks and drops the usual 2-chip platform approach that Intel has been using for quite some time in favor of a system-on-a-chip (SoC) design.Desktop CPUs will feature either two of four processing cores with TDPs of 35, 45, 65 or 95 Watt, and will include a dual-channel DDR3/DDR3L memory controller as well as GT2 or GT1 integrated graphics cores.
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Now that Ivy Bridge has entered volume manufacturing, Intel has turned its attention towards its next-generation architecture code named Haswell, which was just detailed in a couple of leaked slides together with the Lynx Point chipset.

Haswell will be a “Tock” on the chip maker's roadmap meaning that it uses an entirely new architecture built using the 22nm production node.

The first chips using this new core are expected to land in 2013 and according to the slides published by Chiphell, Intel plans to split its product range into two distinct groups.

The first group includes the company's desktop and notebook processors, while the latter is specially designed for Ultrabooks and drops the usual 2-chip platform approach that Intel has been using for quite some time in favor of a system-on-a-chip (SoC) design.

Desktop CPUs will feature either two of four processing cores with TDPs of 35, 45, 65 or 95 Watt, and will include a dual-channel DDR3/DDR3L memory controller as well as GT2 or GT1 integrated graphics cores.

Mobile chips will be available in the same dual or quad-core configurations, but the memory controller only supports DDR3L DIMMs and get the more powerful Intel GT3 GPU.

As far as the Ultrabooks Haswell chips are concerned, these will be limited at supporting dual computing cores.

The TDP of Intel's upcoming system-on-a-chip devices will be set at 15W, while the rest of the notebook processors are rated as 37, 47 or 57 Watt parts.

 
   

Other features include support for the DirectX 11.1 API, support for the AVX2 instruction set as well as a series of IPC improvements meant to increase single-thread performance.

In addition, mobile Haswell processors will also include a configurable TDP technology that enables the CPU to greatly surpass its maximum thermal design power in order to increase its performance when additional cooling is provided (like when used together with an external cooling dock).

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