ICS and Jelly Bean Loaded on Over 25 Percent Active Android Devices

Android 2.3 Gingerbread still runs on over half of active devices

By on October 2nd, 2012 21:31 GMT

Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich and Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, the latest platform releases from Google, are currently accounting for over 25 percent of all active Android devices, the latest data from the Internet giant shows.

At the moment, Ice Cream Sandwich versions, namely Android 4.0.3 and 4.0.4 are present on 23.7 percent of all devices out there, while Android 4.1 Jelly Bean accounts for 1.8 percent of them.

The figure is somehow impressive, considering the fact that Ice Cream Sandwich has been launched in November last year, and that Jelly Bean went official only in June 2012.

However, these operating system iterations still have a long way to go before being able to take down the older Gingerbread OS release, which is currently loaded on 55.8 percent of all active Androids.

The Android 2.3 - 2.3.2 versions are running on 0.3 percent devices, while the 2.3.3 - 2.3.7 variants are powering 55.5 percent of devices.

These numbers represent the total of Android handsets that have accessed the Google Play Store in the 14-day period ending on October 1, 2012, Google explains.

Older OS flavors are still present on Google’s monthly charts, though they are losing significant share and might soon the declared obsolete.

Android 2.2 Froyo is currently found on 12.9 percent handsets, 2.1 Éclair on 3.4 percent of them, 1.6 Donut on 0.4 percent, while Android 1.5 Cupcake is loaded only on 0.1 percent smartphones.

You can learn more on how these platform releases stack up against one another via the charts to the left.

The first shows the platform version distribution, while the second one offers a historical view of the relative number of active Android devices powered by different flavors of Android.

Aimed at developers, the chart “also provides a valuable perspective of how many devices [an] application is compatible with, based on the platform version,” Google explains.

Photo Gallery (2 Images)

Gallery Image
01
Gallery Image
02

Comments