Human Prostate in Mice

Scientists have succeeded growing a human prostate gland in mice

By on February 24th, 2006 07:06 GMT
Australian scientists claim to have succeeded growing a human prostate gland in mice with the aid of embryonic stem cells, an important step in the cure for prostate cancer.

Researchers at the Melbourne Monash University combined embryonic stem cells with the ones of mouse prostate and implanted the compound in mice, where they developed into prostate glands.

This prostate is not the same as in humans, but it has the same tissue, blood vessels, ducts, glands and biological processes.

"Not only will this enable us to develop new, more effective ways of treating diseases that affect nearly every man, but we hope eventually to find a way to prevent these diseases in the first place," said professor Gail Risbridger, the team leader. The prostate is a gland which surrounds the urethra.

"The prostate enlarges over time and while this is subtle, men can have problems such as finding it harder to pass urine," a doctor at the Melbourne hospital stated.

Worldwide, about 650,000 cases are diagnosed each year. In Australia, about 10,000 men are affected every year by prostate cancer, among which 2,500 die; benign prostate cancer will be 90% of men's problem by the age of 80. Prostate cancer is one of the most frequent types of cancer in Australia, after lung cancer.

Renea Taylor, another member of the female group which conducted the study, said that they grew human prostate with the aid of mice as a host. "We have now got a model that we can easily test potentially new clinical therapies for prostate disease," she said.

Renea Taylor, another member of the female group which conducted the study, said that they grew human prostate with the aid of mice as a host. "We have now got a model that we can easily test potentially new clinical therapies for prostate disease," she said.

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