Tim Cook Is Changing the Way Apple Works, Wants to Find New Board Directors

The Wall Street Journal profiled Tim Cook, Apple's CEO

By on July 7th, 2014 21:50 GMT
The Wall Street Journal has some good things to say about Tim Cook's leadership. The profile they've published today explains how Apple is a larger, but different company than it was under Steve Jobs' hand. 
 
It's been almost three years since Tim Cook took over as Apple's CEO and the results are still to be seen. However, the Wall Street Journal believes that Tim Cook is on the right track and his way of leading this company is going to make investors as well as employees happy. Because, why not, the customers are already pretty happy about the products and services they receive from Apple.
 
This long Profile is the work of Daisuke Wakabayashi. He believes Tim Cook is under pressure to release a new magical device since the tech giant had no ground breaking product since the launch of the iPad, in 2010. Back then, the company was still under Steve Jobs' supervision. 
 
The article starts off by talking about what Apple did to encourage investors and goes on about the recent buyout of Beats Electronics. The Wall Street Journal writers believe that Tim Cook is an operations expert and he "is in full bloom after years of subtle internal changes. He is pushing Apple to be more collaborative."
 
The Wall Street Journal cites a few former Apple employees that praise Tim Cook's eye for details and his way of taking care of everything, not just the products. 
 
Apparently, Tim Cook is looking to get new people on Apple's board. The current board consists of eight people, most of them loyal to Steve Jobs, who have been there for over a decade, or even the '90s.
 
Wakabayashi says that Apple is now a kinder and gentler workplace and he's counting in his remarks on numerous interviews he's taken from current and former employees. However, Tim Cook was not available to comment for this story. 
 
The Journal is looking at the challenges Cook is facing as of this fall when his company is about to release at least one new product – the iWatch. According to the same sources, the new CEO is not a product hands-on guy. 
 
The main difference between Steve Jobs and Tim Cook is in the way they deal with new ideas. Steve Jobs was supposedly quick to dismiss whatever he did not like in the first place. On the other hand, Cook is encouraging his employees "with comments like 'let's push that forward' or 'let's see what we can do with that.'" Also, Tim Cook is not so comfortable in saying NO. 
 
The WSJ Profile does not offer any new insights on Tim Cook's life at Apple, but shows fans and investors a different way to run the biggest company in Tech today. 

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