Guy Dressed in Armor Tries to Talk Sense into an Active Volcano

His remains prove volcanoes are a tad conversation shy, not willing to listen

By on December 21st, 2012 08:48 GMT

Only recently, archaeologists going about their business in Japan's Gunma prefecture, fairly close to Mount Haruna, came across the remains of a man wearing a full body armor.

Judging by the looks of these remains, they have reached the conclusion that this man most likely died while trying to talk some sense into an active volcano and convince it to not kill him and/or his people.

Needless to say, the volcano was either conversation shy, or simply not willing to listen, hence this man's dying even faster than the ones who remained in their homes during this volcano eruption.

Sources report that the archaeological site where these remains were found is referred to as the “Pompeii of Japan.”

This is because, back in the sixth century, a powerful volcanic eruption took place here, causing both the surrounding villages and the people inhabiting them to be covered in a thick layer of ash.

Specialists believe that this man used to be a well-known and highly respected figure in society, and that this somehow compelled him to try and rescue the others. They base their assumption on the fact that his armor was very well put together and quite likely expensive.

“Under normal circumstances, you would flee if pyroclastic flows are rushing toward you and bringing waves of heat. But this person died facing it,” argued archaeologist Shinichiro Ohki of the Gunma Archaeological Research Foundation.

“Maybe, if he were someone of a high position, he might have been praying, or doing something in the direction of the volcano and attempting to appease its anger,” this specialist went on to add.

Interestingly enough, this man's remains were accompanied by those of a child, which is why the team of archaeologists presently working on this case are trying to figure out whether or not this man also brought one of his children with him when trying to “negotiate” with the volcano.

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