Google Nexus 7 Is a Kindle Fire Copy and That's a Good Thing

Content is front and center, quite literally, and greets you from the start screen

  The Nexus 7 tablet during the Google I/O 2012 day 1 keynote speech
Like expected, during the day 1 Google I/O 2012 keynote, Google Nexus 7, the ASUS-built Google tablet, was introduced. The specs were leaked previously and are quite impressive.

Like expected, during the day 1 Google I/O 2012 keynote, Google Nexus 7, the ASUS-built Google tablet, was introduced. The specs were leaked previously and are quite impressive.

But the really important part is the new content-centric approach. Your content greets you from the home screen, be it books, magazines or videos.

If that sounds familiar it's because that's exactly what Amazon did with the Kindle Fire and that was probably the most appreciated feature, apart from the price.

Google has learned its lesson and seems to finally have realized that the hardware and the platform don't mean anything without content.

So with its own device, the Google Play Store, which comes with music, movies, TV shows, books and now magazines, takes center stage.

One thing that Google seems to have nailed down is the magazine experience, which is interactive of course, at least for the titles Google had prepared.

Another thing Google is touting is gaming. Considering that the Nexus 7 is powered by the Tegra 3 powerhouse, with 4 general computing cores, one for background tasks and 12 GPU cores, that's hardly surprising.

The biggest thing about the Nexus 7 though is its price, it starts at $199. It's available in the US, UK and Australia today. What's more, you can buy it directly from the Google Play Store. Google promised that other countries will be added soon. 

A nice part is that you also get $25 credit in the Play Store and you also get a free copy of the latest Transformers movie, a book and several magazines.

It also comes with an optimized YouTube app, with an emphasis on HD content, as well as a custom Google Maps app. Oh, and it also comes with Chrome as the default browser.

The device is clearly aimed at Kindle Fire, if anything it's a blatant copy, granted, with significantly improved specs. Considering that the Fire sold in the millions and it was the first Android tablet to sell in serious numbers, though still way short of the iPad's.

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