Google Glasses Make Us Eat Less

Due to the AR glasses’ rescale tool, we eat less, as our food seems bigger

  Google glasses make us believe we eat more than we actually do
A study led by a group of Japanese researchers from the University of Tokyo suggests that Google Glasses could act as a diet pill, by manipulating our perception on the amount of food we eat.

A study led by a group of Japanese researchers from the University of Tokyo suggests that Google Glasses could act as a diet pill, by manipulating our perception on the amount of food we eat.

The scientists have created a particular software which allows AR glasses to perform a real-time resizing of the food, Daily Mail reports.

The image appears perfectly natural, since the complex mechanism thought for it also resizes the hand's shape, along with that of the object hold.

It has been proven that we can be tricked as to eat 10% less than normally, due to a saturation sense induced psychologically.

“This technology can stimulate a feeling of having eaten enough visually,” said Takuji Narumi, a research participant.

“We've found that when food looks bigger, you feel full right away, but when it looks small, you don't feel full even if you eat a lot.”

The mechanism also has a reverse effect: it can artificially raise our appetite by 15%. Fair enough, I'd say.

Comments