Global Warming Might Keep Trees Green Even in Late Autumn

New environmental conditions allow leaves to stay green even in fall

  Global warming could keep autumn leaves green longer than expected
By now, you are probably well accustomed to our saying that phenomena such as climate change and global warming stand to cause the oceans to rise, and that new environmental conditions have also altered the behavioral patterns of some animal species.

By now, you are probably well accustomed to our saying that phenomena such as climate change and global warming stand to cause the oceans to rise, and that new environmental conditions have also altered the behavioral patterns of some animal species.

However, recent news concerning these global shifts informs us that, thanks to global warming, we might soon be able to admire the green foliage of trees even in late autumn.

Researchers explain that trees typically let go of their leaves when external factors such as the amount of sunlight they have at their disposal and average temperatures indicate that winter is approaching, and that the time has come to curtail photosynthesis.

As a result of this, the leaves gradually lose their chlorophyll, and since this chemical compound is the one that gives them that spring-summer green color it comes as no surprise that, when the leaves no longer contain it, they change their color.

Since vegetation is “programmed” to act in the aforementioned manner, one does not have be an expert to realize that ever increasing average temperatures worldwide are quite likely to cause these trees to become somewhat “confused”.

In other words: rather than abiding by what the calendar says, they will follow the instructions provided by the aforementioned external cues and remain green for longer periods of time.

In case anyone was wondering, these statements made by researchers are not pure speculations based on laboratory work alone.

Quite the contrary: having monitored how vegetation responded to the change of seasons over a period of several decades, specialists from Massachusetts have concluded that, when compared to previous years, the average peak color change is already taking place two or three days later than expected.

Hoping to draw more attention to this ongoing phenomenon, AccuWeather made public a video that thoroughly explains the effect of climate change and global warming on autumn leaves.

This video is made available to you down below.

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