Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Made Kids Fat

Because of radiations risks, children were forced to spend too much time indoors

  Fukushima now blamed for making kids in Japan fat
Recent news from Japan informs us that, as peculiar as this might sound, the Fukushima nuclear disaster must be held accountable for upping the country's obesity rates.

Recent news from Japan informs us that, as peculiar as this might sound, the Fukushima nuclear disaster must be held accountable for upping the country's obesity rates.

Thus, it seems that the children living fairly close to the place where said nuclear meltdown occurred are growing ever plumper.

As was to be expected, parents are concerned about the increase in their children’s waistline and would very much like it if the country's high officials decided to do something about this emerging problem.

According to the International Business Times, the explanation behind Fukushima disaster's making kids in Japan fat is the one detailed below.

Following the nuclear accident, people living in the proximity of the power plant forbade their children to go out and play, simply because they were running the risk of becoming exposed to significant levels of radiation. As well as this, schools placed restrictions on outdoor activities.

This translated into the kids' not getting enough exercise, and this in turn led to their starting to put on weight.

Interestingly enough, this happened despite the fact that several schools set up indoor playing areas, which goes to show how important fresh air is when it comes to staying fit.

As one education official put it, “Children cannot play outdoors, so they now engage in less physical exercise. That may be one cause.”

Regardless of the fact that many months had passed since the nuclear disaster occurred and although the “rules” concerning outdoor exercise are now more lenient, it seems that the damage has already been done.

To cut a long story short, the Fukushima prefecture in Japan in now home to some of the country's plumpest children.

However, the government promises that immediate measures will be taken in order to deal with this issue, and that soon enough the country will put this public health problem behind it.

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