Fedora 14 Officially Released for IBM System z 64-bit

  Fedora 14
Phil Knirsch announced a last evening, January 25th, the immediate availability for download of the Fedora 14 operating system for IBM System z (s390x) 64-bit systems.

Phil Knirsch announced a last evening, January 25th, the immediate availability for download of the Fedora 14 operating system for IBM System z (s390x) 64-bit systems.

Fedora 14, codenamed Laughlin, comes with a lot of new features and updated packages. The last release of Fedora for IBM System z was Fedora 6, announced on October 24th, 2006. Therefore, the Fedora IBM System z (s390x) Secondary Arch team is proud to announce a new and improved release of this operating system.

"It's been a long time since we last had an official release of IBM System z on Fedora... In fact and to be precise, it's been 134,265,600 seconds or 2,237,760 minutes or 37,296 hours or 1554 days since Fedora 6 was released on October 24th 2006 which was the last release where IBM System z was included."

"But today, today changes all this. As today, the Fedora IBM System z (s390x) Secondary Arch team proudly presents the Fedora 14 for IBM System z 64bit official release!" - said Phil Knirsch in the official release announcement.

The Fedora Project is a Red-Hat-sponsored and community-supported open-source project. Fedora Linux is an operating system based on the Linux kernel, which focuses on wide access, distribution and free modification.

Fedora Linux is built by a worldwide community (the Fedora Project), which grants access to anyone wishing to further advance the development of open-source software. Fedora 10 is available as GNOME and KDE Live CD editions for 32bit and 64bit platforms, and the usual CDs/DVD edition for x86, x86_64 and PPC architectures.

If you haven't upgraded yet to Fedora 14, you can grab the GNOME or KDE Live CDs from Softpedia, here and here. The Fedora 14 installable only DVD is also available for download from Softpedia, here.

Fedora 14 for IBM System z 64-bit can be downloaded right now from Softpedia, here.

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