Dream JB Was a Social Experiment, No iPhone 5 Jailbreak for You

Site author decides to issue an unconventional warning against jailbreak scams

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Confirming our fears that Dream JB was a fake service, the site’s author has stepped forward with a confession that there’s no jailbreak to be had for iOS 6 or the iPhone 5 – it was a mere experiment, the author says.

Confirming our fears that Dream JB was a fake service, the site’s author has stepped forward with a confession that there’s no jailbreak to be had for iOS 6 or the iPhone 5 – it was a mere experiment, the author says.

Supporting our own crusade against jailbreak scams, Dream JB originally emerged as a seemingly legitimate service that promised to deliver an untethered jailbreak for iOS 6 and iPhone 5 handsets.

Renowned hackers warned that the service could be fake, and our own source pointed out to similar scams in the past.

We’re not too happy to report that the service wasn’t real, but at least your wallet is not missing any cash as a result of this admission.

According to its author, who remains anonymous, “DreamJB was intended as a social experiment. In the matter of a mere week, over 20,000 people followed @DreamJailbreak on twitter,” he says.

Having scored over 300,000 unique views, the author concluded that “People believed in a ‘jailbreak’ that originally provided no proof at all.”

He then explains the reasons behind his social experiment.

“There are services out there that charge for jailbreaks that are intended to be free. Imagine what could have happened should this have gone for sale?”

“The provided proof tonight was intended as a final boost to the viewers before this message was released.”

The Dream JB author urges jailbreakers to be careful when it comes to solutions that are “advertised outside of the prominent and accepted dev teams. Do some research and follow them on Twitter now,” he says.

“Dismiss any claims made by anybody, unless it has been confirmed from the dev team members,” he adds. “Should a real jailbreak ever surface, they'll be the first to give it the OK.”

Softpedia has issued countless posts with similar warnings regarding fake jailbreak services.

A quick visit to our handy “jailbreak scam” tag should give you an idea of just how successful these services have been, and how easy it is to get duped.

“This experiment is exactly as it was named. Simply just a dream,” the author concludes.

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