Download Debian 6.0.6 Squeeze

The latest version of the Debian OS can be downloaded from Softpedia

By on October 1st, 2012 07:37 GMT

A couple of days ago, the Debian project proudly announced the immediate availability for download of the sixth maintenance release of the Debian 6 Linux operating system.

Debian 6.0.6 adds corrections for security problems, as well as improvements to some serious issues. Some of the packages included in the previous versions of the distribution were also updated with the Debian 6.0.6 release.

"Please note that this update does not constitute a new version of Debian 6.0 but only updates some of the packages included."

"There is no need to throw away 6.0 CDs or DVDs but only to update via an up-to-date Debian mirror after an installation, to cause any out of date packages to be updated," the official announcement read.

Highlights of Debian 6.0.6:

• An alpine fix crash in embedded UW-IMAP copy has been repaired;
• FORTIFY_SOURCE format string has been fixed;
• A DoS in RPC implementation has been repaired;
• A libmtp fix device flags for some devices has been implemented and support for new devices has been added;
• A plymouth fixed the init script to not fail when the package is removed;
• An iceweasel regression fix has been implemented;
• GMail authentication issues have been repaired;
• Several packages were removed.

Check out the complete changelog in the official announcement.

Users who already have a Debian 6.0 installation won't have to reinstall the system all over again. They just need to perform a regular update, as only a small number of packages will be downloaded from security.debian.org.

"New installation media and CD and DVD images containing updated packages will be available soon at the regular locations."

"Upgrading to this revision online is usually done by pointing the aptitude (or apt) package tool (see the sources.list(5) manual page) to one of Debian's many FTP or HTTP mirrors," was stated towards the end of the announcement.

Download Debian 6.0.6
right now from Softpedia.

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