Donkey, Buffalo and Goat Meat Found in Beef Products in South Africa

Luckily for the people eating them, these beef products contain no horsemeat

By on February 26th, 2013 16:08 GMT

The horsemeat scandal made headlines for several weeks in a row, and odds are more disconcerting news on this topic will appear throughout the following days.

Meanwhile, here is something to ponder on: according to three researchers working with the Stellenbosch University, the so-called beef products sold in South Africa contain donkey, buffalo and goat meat.

By the looks of it, chicken (23%) and pork (37%) also make their way into foods that are not supposed to contain them on a regular basis.

Apart from these, the beef products marketed in this part of the world have soya and gluten listed as two rather unconventional ingredients.

“The meat industry’s failure to provide vital information on products may not only decrease consumer confidence in their organizations, but also in the meat industry as a whole. I do not believe that the current penalties issued for non-compliance are sufficient to deter fraudulent practices,” commented on these findings Dr. Donna-Maree Cawthorn.

Sources report that all of the aforementioned ingredients were found in roughly 68% of the beef products taken into consideration for this study.

The list includes minced meats, burger patties, deli meats, sausages and dried meats.

Needless to say, the labels accompanying these beef products failed to mention anything about the actual recipes used when making them.

“Our study confirms that the mislabelling of processed meats is commonplace in South Africa and not only violates food labelling regulations, but also poses economic, religious, ethical and health impacts,” argued Professor Louw Hoffman, currently working with the Stellenbosch University's Department of Animal Sciences.

“Our findings raise significant concern on the functioning of the meat supply chain in South Africa. Even though we have local regulations that protect consumers from being sold falsely described or inferior foodstuffs, we need these measures to be appropriately enforced,” Professor Louw Hoffman added.

Luckily for the people eating them, none of these products was found to contain horsemeat.

Comments