Doctors “Freeze” Baby and Save His Life

Edward Ives was born with supraventricular tachycardia, which put him in grave danger

  Child born with SVT was “frozen” so that doctors could save his life (not pictured)
Edward Ives was born with a condition that makes his heart beat almost twice as fast than normal. He has supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), which means that, when he was born, he had an elevated heartbeat of 300.

Edward Ives was born with a condition that makes his heart beat almost twice as fast than normal. He has supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), which means that, when he was born, he had an elevated heartbeat of 300.

Because SVT can lead to heart or organ failure, doctors had to “freeze” him so they could stabilize the heartbeat and then keep it steady, ABC News reports.

Edward’s mother, Claire, recalls the ordeal she went through, admitting that even she had lost hope at one point, when the first time the baby’s temperature was lowered did not return the anticipated results.

The second time the baby’s temperature was lowered, the doctors managed to stabilize the heartbeat.

Ten days after giving birth, Claire got to hold her son. Two months later, she took him home. He will still be supervised, but is expected to recover completely.

“It's made me appreciate all the small things about my children. It's the best thing ever to bring him home,” Claire says. She’s now training for a half-marathon to raise awareness on neonatal SVT.

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