Dietary Supplements Taken by Military Troops Contain Too Much Caffeine

The amounts of caffeine soldiers are exposed to can impact on their health, study says

  Study says the dietary supplements taken by military troops contain too much caffeine
It was not very long ago when the news that a young girl's death might have been caused by the amount of caffeine found in one of the energy drinks she ingested caused quite a media stir.

It was not very long ago when the news that a young girl's death might have been caused by the amount of caffeine found in one of the energy drinks she ingested caused quite a media stir.

Caffeine is now back in the spotlight, courtesy of a new study claiming that the dietary supplements distributed in military bases and consumed by soldiers on a regular basis might toy with their organisms in the same way in which two cans of Mountain Dew toyed with 14-year-old Anais Fournier's body.

More so if the people taking these dietary supplements eat or drink other caffeinated products as well.

This study on caffeine-based dietary supplements was published in the online journal JAMA Internal Medicine only yesterday, and it consists of a thorough investigation of the chemical profile of as many as 31 supplements now used by military troops on a regular basis.

Out of these 31 different types of dietary supplements, fewer than 50% displayed accurate information concerning their caffeine concentrations.

As well as this, some of them were found “guilty” of containing significantly more caffeine than five of one's run-off-the-mill 12-ounce Mountain Dew.

“Caffeine is consumed in a wide range of popular items including coffee, teas, sodas, energy drinks, energy gels, chocolate, gums, and over-the-counter medications. Dietary supplements, which are commonly consumed by military personnel, 4-5 are a poorly characterized source of caffeine,” the study reads.

Furthermore, “Excessive caffeine consumption, particularly when combined with other stimulants, may increase the risk of hypokalemia, rhabdomyolysis, and other heat-related injuries among athletes and military personnel.”

No information concerning the names of the dietary supplements analyzed during this study was made available to the general public.

However, it is a well-known fact that some military troops rely heavily on such supplements in order to keep fit and lively, which is why paying closer attention to their chemical make-up might not be such a bad idea.

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