“Dark Patch” Pinned Down in the Brains of Killers and Abusers

German neurologist claims that the center for evilness lies in the brain's central lobe

  Neurologist pins down "dark patches" in the brains of convicted killers and abusers
A German researcher named Dr. Gerhard Roth is now making headlines following his going public with the news that he had succeeded in pinning down the exact spot where evilness lies in an individual's brain.

A German researcher named Dr. Gerhard Roth is now making headlines following his going public with the news that he had succeeded in pinning down the exact spot where evilness lies in an individual's brain.

More precisely, this neurologist maintains that, after analyzing the brains of several convicted killers and abusers, he came to notice that their central lobe displayed what he describes as a “dark patch.”

It is his belief that these dark patches are a clear indicator of the fact that the people who commit atrocious murders and similar violent deeds more often than not only do so because this glitch in the make-up of their brain urges them to follow this course of actions.

As Daily Mail reports, Dr. Gerhard Roth's precise statements on the matter at hand were as follows:

“When you look at the brain scans of hardened criminals, there are almost always severe shortcomings in the lower forehead part of the brain.”

Furthermore, “There are cases where someone becomes criminal as a result of a tumour or an injury in that area, and after an operation to remove the tumor, that person was completely normal again. Or there are physiological deficits, because certain substances such as serotonin in the forebrain are not working effectively. But this is definitely the region of the brain where evil is formed and where it lurks.”

Despite the fact that these findings suggest that violent behavior is the result of a faulty biological make-up, Dr. Gerhard Roth wished to draw attention to the fact that violent responses to various circumstances that an individual finds himself in are not necessarily automatic.

In other words, there is always a choice to make, meaning that the brain can potentially find a way to compensate for and control these violent tendencies.

Dr. Gerhard Roth reached these conclusions while investigating the brains of several offenders convicted over the years by the German government.

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