Consumer Reports Says It’s Better to Stick with Windows 7

Windows 8 is mostly aimed at touchscreen devices, a new report emphasizes

  The lack of a Start button is considered a serious problem for many Windows 8 users
Windows 8 has already been deemed confusing, difficult to use and even slower when compared to its predecessors, despite Microsoft’s claims that it has sold 40 million copies in just one month.

Windows 8 has already been deemed confusing, difficult to use and even slower when compared to its predecessors, despite Microsoft’s claims that it has sold 40 million copies in just one month.

Consumer Reports says that it’s better to stick with Windows 7, especially because Windows 8 is mostly an operating system aimed at touchscreen devices.

The publication then goes on to reveal some of the reasons why users should stay with Windows 7 than make the move to Windows 8.

First of all, Windows 7 is a very reliable operating system, a solid working environment and has received very favorable reviews, the report reads. “If you've been happy with Windows 7 and even Windows XP up until now, there's no compelling reason to switch to Windows 8,” it says.

Besides the fact that it’s specifically designed for touchscreen computers, Windows 8 is not recommended for those who prefer a familiar working environment. The lack of a Start button and the introduction of a Start Screen could make the new OS pretty difficult to use.

“So if you prefer the old way, go with Windows 7,” Consumer Reports says.

Last but not least, drivers still need to be updated, while a Windows 7 computer could also come with a very special discount now that Windows 8 is already on the market.

Of course, some could say that this is nothing more than a new report supposed to bash the new operating system, but picking between Windows 7 and Windows 8 remains a tough task for many users out there.

In the end, it’s all “a matter of personal preference,” as Consumer Reports suggests, but one thing is for sure: Windows 8 is yet to become a bestseller, even though Microsoft doesn’t comment too much on this.

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