Coffee Can Help People Live Longer

Three cups of coffee per day are more than enough to add years to one's life

  Coffee can actually help people live longer, study says
The Journal of Caffeine Research has recently witnessed the publication of a new study claiming that, when drank in moderation (i.e. no more than three cups per day), coffee can actually help people live longer.

The Journal of Caffeine Research has recently witnessed the publication of a new study claiming that, when drank in moderation (i.e. no more than three cups per day), coffee can actually help people live longer.

Prior to their reaching the conclusion that coffee can add years to one's life, the researchers took to analyzing the health records of a total of 500,000 people.

The information they collected in this manner led them to believe that, the more cups of coffee these people consumed on a daily basis, the lower their risk of death was.

According to Daily Mail, the health threats that coffee is fully capable of tackling are heart and respiratory diseases, strokes, diabetes and sometimes even infections.

However, there is a catch: it looks like coffee only proves beneficial to one's health when those drinking it are still in their middle age.

Thus, drinking three cups of coffee per day while one is a tad too young or a tad too old can negatively impact on one's overall health.

The people taken into consideration for this research were carefully monitored over a period of 12 years, and in the end, it was agreed upon that their chances of experiencing an early death were reduced by 10-15% as a result of their habit of drinking coffee roughly three times per day.

Interestingly enough, the specialists who published this study wished to draw attention to the fact that combining coffee drinking with other activities such as smoking still takes its toll on one's life expectancy, simply because cigarettes are nothing if not detrimental to one's health.

Furthermore, it looks like people who enjoy drinking too much coffee do not shy away from alcohol, read meat and sedentary lifestyle either.

“In our study, the participants who drank coffee were far more likely to smoke cigarettes, which is a very strong risk factor for death,” argued Dr. Neal Freedman, a researcher currently working with the National Cancer Institute in the United States.

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