CM7 RC2 ROMs Available for Download

  CyanogenMod-7.0.0-RC2 released
A new version of the popular CyanogenMod ROMs are now available for download, offering Android users out there the possibility to have a taste of the latest 2.3.3 Gingerbread flavor of Google's mobile operating system.

A new version of the popular CyanogenMod ROMs are now available for download, offering Android users out there the possibility to have a taste of the latest 2.3.3 Gingerbread flavor of Google's mobile operating system.

The latest release marks another step towards the final flavor of CyanogenMod-7.0.0 (CM7), and was marked as RC2 (release candidate), which should bring the development in its final stages.

“Another round of release candidates for CM7 are on their way out,” a recent post on the CyanogenMod blog reads.

The new CyanogenMod-7.0.0-RC2 follows a few weeks the first release candidate the development team pushed out for Android enthusiasts, which was based on the Android 2.3 Gingerbread OS version.

However, as stated above, the new release brings the OS up to Android 2.3.3, while adding some of other enhancements as well.

“This version is an update to Android 2.3.3, and also brings a few new features like WiMAX on the EVO (from #TEAMWIN), Notification Profiles, and many bugfixes. We are feature-frozen and in bugfix mode at this point, so please let us know about any issues on our bug tracker,” the said blog post continues.

Users who are fond of downloading and installing these custom ROMs on their devices would be able to find more info on the new CyanogenMod-7.0.0-RC2 on the project's wiki or in their forums. Download links for specific devices are available on the project's website as well.

The installation of these ROMs would require for users to root their devices, and those who are not familiar with the process are advised to stay away, especially since the rooting process would void warranty of their mobile phone.

However, in case there are those who would like to give the new software a try, they should know that they are doing so at their own risk, provided that something would go wrong during the rooting or the installation of a custom ROM.

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