Breaking Dawn Scams Have Already Begun

  Facebook Breaking Dawn scam in circulation
Facebook scammers have begun using the upcoming 'Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn' movie to lure users to rogue surveys and trick them into spamming their friends.

Facebook scammers have begun using the upcoming 'Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn' movie to lure users to rogue surveys and trick them into spamming their friends.

According to security researchers from Trend Micro, there is a new scam circulating on the social networking website which promises free tickets to Breaking Dawn Part 2.

That's an interesting choice of theme for attackers giving that the movie is not expected for another a year, being scheduled for release on November 16, 2012.

The scammers might be hoping that people interested in Part 1, which will open on November 18, 2011, will want to obtain tickets in advance for Part 2 also.

Twilight Saga has a very strong fan base, so it's reasonable to assume that people who are making plans for Part 1 are also interested in the second part.

The spam messages posted by victims read "Get A Free Tickets to Twilight Breaking Dawn Part 2!" and link to an external page.

This rogue page asks visitors to take a quick survey in order to qualify for the offer. After answering a single question and inputting their email addresses they are congratulated for winning a free ticket and are asked to provide their personal information.

The form includes a field for phone number, but as past scams have demonstrated, giving one's phone number during one of these scams is a very bad idea and could result the user being subscribed to premium-rate services.

Users who fill in the form are told they can also win a VISA gift card if they take a second survey. Of course, there are no free tickets or gift cards and taking these surveys only help scammers earn money through affiliate marketing programs.

As usual, users are asked to post the spam message on their walls in order to propagate the scam. People who did this are advised to delete the messages and contact their mobile carriers to opt out from any premium services they might have been subscribed to.

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