Beware of This “Bypass iCloud Activation Lock” Scam

Amid a hacker’s recent success, a scam has emerged claiming to offer the same benefits

By on May 28th, 2014 11:32 GMT

Although it is possible to bypass the iCloud Activation Lock using a hack developed by team doulCi, it seems there is more than one “solution” out there claiming to do the same. However, you need to beware of those that can potentially harm you.

Last week, a team of hackers called doulCi came up with a way to bypass the iCloud Activation Lock used by Apple to seal iDevices tight in case of theft. The gist of it is if you have your iPhone stolen, the thief won’t be able to use it without entering your Apple ID and password, essentially bricking the device.

But doulCi found a way to work around this issue, and their solution seems to be 100% reliable. Security experts weighed in on the matter and concluded that Apple will have to roll out a firmware patch (iOS 7.1.2) to address the issue.

Without the patch, thieves can activate and sell stolen devices as new, which makes it pretty obvious why Google has recorded a lot of queries that sound like this: “How to Bypass Activation Lock IOS 7.”

Case in point, a scam located at iphonehackios7.blogspot uses this precise SEO trick, as well as others, to allegedly help you remove iCloud Activation on your iDevice.

“Apple has created a protective measure if you lose or if your iPhone is stolen it can be blocked, If your iPhone is blocked when you want to activate it will ask you to enter your email to send code to the rightful owner, but because you aren’t rightful owner you can’t have that information. But now with this software will you solve that problem. This is the hack tool with which activate your iPhone quickly and easily. Below will explain step by step how to do it,” the author explains.

It then proceeds to offer a file download: “IPhone_Hacktivate_Tool.zip.” The download button takes you to a fairly common loop-scam that asks you to complete a survey in order to get your file. They’ll even ask for your phone number, which could spell trouble. In any case, you’ll never get to the hacktivate tool (which probably doesn’t even exist).

For what it’s worth, if you happen to find yourself locked out of your own iDevice (for whatever reason), team doulCi’s solution at least isn’t a scam, so you can go ahead and use that one, at your own risk of course. Whatever you do, don’t give away your phone number on the web. In most cases, you'll be dealing with a scam.

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