Apple - Brainwasher Extraordinaire (Video)

The Mac maker’s latest keynote summed up in ten adjectives

By Filip Truta   September 16th, 2009 13:20 GMT
Few have bothered to note that an Apple keynote is also a brainwasher filled with adjectives like great, awesome, incredible, and the list continues. In this YouTube video, the “Incredible, amazing, awesome Apple” is shown as someone who is not an Apple fan sees the company. Apple has outdone even itself at this year’s iPod event, from a semantic point of view.

Dubbed “It’s Only Rock and Roll but We Love It,” this year’s music event saw the introduction of three new iPods – one that does video, one that comes in a rainbow of colors, and one that can go up to 64GB of memory –, a certain iTunes 9, iPhone OS 3.1 and other stuff. But, whatever Apple announces, and whatever Apple exec is on stage doing the presentation, certain adjectives just don’t miss from the company’s repertoire.

As many of you have probably noticed, Apple products are always the world’s most... something, but they are also great, awesome, incredible, unbelievably easy to use and, of course, very useful, mind blowing, stunning, and let’s not forget smart, which has eventually turned into genius.

It is worth noting that suggestion plays a very important role in Apple’s keynote presentations, and, while the products are indeed great, Apple exaggerates (so to speak) in order to emphasize its “great” nature. A while back, Softpedia suggested that Apple’s Jony Ive would probably do a great job as CEO at Apple, if only just for keynotes.

“Apple is a company that likes to put on a show,” we said in October, last year. “It doesn't just say ‘it's got this and that, it's really neat to use, so go out and buy it.’ No. Apple puts its best men on stage, and has them talk of its products like they fell out of the sky [...] Even Apple's officials sound surprised at the achievements they've had with their latest products [...] Just like Jobs, [Ive] uses tricks (if you will) like long gaps in speech, sometimes followed by a sigh, frowning when emphasizing an exciting feature and others. His power of conviction comes very, very close to Steve's.”

So, why would you say Apple does this? Is it the passion it has for its “great” products, or is it that it really wants to brainwash every soul into choosing Macs and iPods?

via Fortune


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