Aimee Copeland Takes First Public Walk Since Infection with Flesh-Eating Bacteria

Amputee talks abilities and disabilities with Katie Couric on her new show

By on September 13th, 2012 11:20 GMT

In May this year, a 24-year-old girl named Aimee Copeland made international headlines for the bravery with which she fought for her life after becoming infected with a rare and terribly dangerous flesh-eating bacteria.

She was zip-lining in Georgia over a lake when her line broke and she fell into the water, hurting her leg on a rock.

Through the wound entered dangerous bacteria that soon claimed her limbs. Still, Aimee never despaired and, more importantly, never even considered giving up on life.

On Katie Curic’s new show, “Katie,” Aimee took her first walk on what is officially her first public outing since the terrible accident in which she lost her hands, most of her left leg and the lower part of her right one.

Check out the first video below for her grand entrance.

She’s now using prosthetics – and she’s starting a new life in more ways than one.

“That felt so good. I've been sitting or lying down for so long, just being vertical. You take for granted being able to look people in the eye,” Aimee told a very emotional Katie.

“I don't like to be called disabled or handicapped. I say I have different abilities,” she adds.

Also on the same interview, Aimee explains that she never thought of giving up on life, even when her parents told her that she would have to face life without the use of her limbs.

That was the most difficult moment, she says.

“I think the most extreme moment was when my dad lifted up my hands for me to see. My fingers were black and my hands were deep blood red and he said 'We're going to have to cut them off.' And I said, 'Let's do this.' What else are you going to do? Live with dead hands?” Aimee explains.

After “Katie,” Aimee also sat down with ABC for a brief interview, a video for which you will also find embedded below.

She talked about plans to learn to drive, her career hopes and how it feels to be considered a “miracle.”



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