Adaptive All-in-One PCs with Batteries Being Pushed by Intel

It is basically the new term for desktop-tablet hybrid devices

  Lenovo IdeaCentre Horizon
Convertible tablets and laptops have been around for years but, despite the occasional mention in the news, the same cannot be said about convertible all-in-one desktop computers. Intel wants this to change.

Rather than convertible all-in-one, Intel has chosen a different term to describe AiO PCs that can turn into tablet form factors: adaptive all-in-ones.

The ASUS 18.4-Inch Android desktop-tablet hybrid is just one example, and a borderline one too. The most recent and noteworthy, but still just one. The 27-Inch Lenovo IdeaCentre Horizon is the second, and closer to Intel's idea.

Having decided that this type of PC should be promoted, Intel has set in motion preparations to boost sales of such computers.

First, it issued a guidance, of sorts, for what the basic specifications should be, starting with the display size.

18.4 inches was named as minimum, with 27 inches set as the upper limit. It makes sense, because larger systems wouldn't be able to operate for long on a battery, and would be too large to comfortably switch from flat tablet to upright positions.

That's the second required trait: all adaptive all-in-one computers need to be able to lay flat on surfaces.

The industrial design should still remain similar to that of standard AiOs though, with x86 CPU, customizable memory and storage, connectivity, etc.

Verily, the only difference in regard to internal hardware is the presence of a battery (high-density lithium-polymer batteries), so that they may be carried around. Power adapters will still be provided of course, for recharging and operating off wall sockets.

The hardware would be centralized by thin mini-ITX mainboards from Gigabyte, ASRock, ECS, and China-based Wibtek.

Finally, PMMA touch panels ought to be installed over the LCDs, edges protected by cases made of magnesium-aluminum alloys.

In 2013, Intel hopes to see sales tripled compared to 2008, and consumer awareness raised in regard to adaptive AiO PCs.

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