AMD Bulldozer FX-Series Launch Date Confirmed by Micro Center

These next-generation chips will arrive on October 12

  AMD 8-core FX-Series processors retail packaging
US-based computer retailer Micro Center has confirmed the launch date of AMD's next-generation FX-Series processors based on the high-performance Bulldozer architecture, which are expected to arrive on October 12.

US-based computer retailer Micro Center has confirmed the launch date of AMD's next-generation FX-Series processors based on the high-performance Bulldozer architecture, which are expected to arrive on October 12.

"AMD is launching their new AM3+ FX series processors on 10/12/11. We currently have a number of AM3 + compatible motherboards in stock. These motherboards will support the new AM3 + FX processors as well as legacy AM3 processors."

The initial launch will include six FX-Series processors, four of them featuring eight processing cores while the two other include six and respectively four cores.

The fastest of these upcoming chips is called the FX-8150 and it sports a base frequency of 3.6GHz, a maximum Turbo frequency of 4.2GHz, 8MB of Level 2 cache memory, and has a TDP of 125W.

Right bellow this CPU stands the FX-8120 that also packs eight processing cores and other similar features, but comes clocked at 3.1GHz (4GHz in Turbo mode).

The FX-8120 will also be the only AMD FX-Series processor to be available in two different SKUs, one featuring a 125W TDP while the other is a 95W part.

The three remaining processors are the FX-8100, which has a base frequency of 2.8GHz and a maximum Turbo frequency of 3.7GHz, the six-core FX-6100 with a 3.3GHz base speed, 3.8GHz Turbo and 6MB of Level 2 cache memory and the quad-core FX-4100, which is clocked at 3.6GHz and can reach 3.8GHz when Turbo Core is active.

All the above mentioned processors are based on AMD's CMT architecture (Cluster-based Multi-Threading), which relies on a modular design, each module containing two computing cores.

Some of the resources available are shared between the two cores, which enabled AMD to reduce the die-size as well as the power requirements of the CPUs built using this architecture. (via Nordic Hardware)

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